World Top 10 Transnational Organized Crime

Although Hollywood might have us believe that criminal organizations are composed of lovable mobsters with Italian accents who say things like Eh, fhuggetaboutit, the reality is that organized crime syndicates operate in every country on the planet, and the bigger they grow, the more brutal they become. Few communities on earth are untouched in some way by organized crime, whether its the extortion racket that shakes down local merchants or the drugs that trickle down from global cartels into the hands of street gangs.

The following article presents the top 10 criminal organizations worldwide, along with their home base, alleged criminal activities, and when possible or available, the current boss of the organization.

No.10 The Five Families

Home base: United States
Criminal activities: Bookmaking, loan-sharking, extortion, gambling, drug trafficking
Boss: Vincent Basciano, Nicholas Corozzo, Carmine Persico, Daniel Leo, Vittorio Amuso

The five mafia crime families out of New York – Bonanno, Colombo, Gambino, Genovese, and Lucchese – have controlled much of organized crime in the U.S. since the 1930s, but these days they arent remotely what they used to be, thanks to an extended and devoted effort on the part of law enforcement to shut them down. Of the five, the Genovese family is the largest and most powerful. The U.S. “La Cosa Nostra” was founded by the notorious Lucky Luciano, himself a member of the Sicilian mafia who came to the U.S. in the 1920s, and brought much of the mafias structures and practices with him.

No.9 United Bamboo

Home base: Taiwan
Criminal activities: Debt collection, contract killing, loan-sharking, gambling, bribery
Boss: None

Believed to be Taiwans top triad, with as many as 10,000 members, United Bamboo operates according to a decidedly old-school code of ethics that stresses unity among members as well as harmony with the people.

Although they have repeatedly denied it, United Bamboo is believed to be entrenched in drug trafficking, and their sphere of influence stretches into the KMT, Taiwans ruling political party, as well as throughout Asia, the Pacific, Europe, and the Americas. Unlike other syndicates, United Bamboo is not overseen by a single boss, but rather has a more horizontal structure to its hierarchy.

No.8 Tijuana Cartel

Home base: Northern Mexico (Tijuana and Baja)
Criminal activities: Drug trafficking, contract killings, bribery, racketeering
Boss: Eduardo Arellano Felix

The fall of the Colombian cartels in the 1990s created a vacuum that three Mexican cartels have more than adequately filled. Specifically, they are the Sinaloa cartel, headed by Joaquin Guzman; the Juarez cartel, headed by Vicente Carrillo Fuentes; and the Tijuana cartel, probably headed by Eduardo Arellano Felix.

The DEA regards the Tijuana cartel, also known as the Arellano Felix Organization (AFO), as the most violent and aggressive among the three, and turf wars between the three have cost hundreds of lives over the last decade.It is believed that the AFO hands out as much as $1 million a week in bribes to stay in business.

No.7 Dai Huen Jai

Home base: China
Criminal activities: Drug trafficking, loan-sharking, human-trafficking, fraud, counterfeiting, prostitution, fraud, human trafficking
Boss: None

The Dai Huen Jai are a curious product of Mao Zedongs Cultural Revolution; on Maos death much of the paramilitary Red Guard were sent to re-education camps, where they suffered horrendous abuse and emerged even more corrupt than when they went in. Unlike most organized crime syndicates, the Dai Heun Jai seems to lack formal organization; in fact, theyve been compared to men meeting up for a pickup basketball game. The members are as mysterious as they are notorious, and are believed to be spread in loose confederations throughout Asia, the Americas and Australia.

No.6 Sicilian Mafia

Home base: Sicily
Criminal activities: Drug trafficking, political corruption, arms trafficking, contract killing, arson, fraud, counterfeiting
Boss: Matteo Messina Denaro (reputed)

Organized by territory and featuring as many as 100 families, the Sicilian mafia dates back to the middle of the 19th century, but didnt assume its criminal identity until the early part of the 20th century. When Lucky Luciano exported the mafia to the U.S. in the 1930s, their criminal base expanded exponentially, and even today theyre believed to have as many as 2,500 American affiliates.

In Sicily, they came to power and wealth through control of building contracts and soon became a major player in heroin and gun trafficking. Although today they have been challenged by other Italian syndicates, the assassinations of two Italian magistrates in the 1990s reminded everyone that the Sicilian mafia is still a force to be reckoned with.

No.5 14K

Home base: Hong Kong
Criminal activities: Extortion, contract killing, kidnapping, gambling, prostitution, loan sharking, human trafficking, counterfeiting, drug trafficking
Boss: Unknown

The 14K is one of the largest traditional triads in Hong Kong, and in the 1990s, it was regarded as the largest in the world until a high-profile criminal trial in Portugal brought down the alleged head of a 14K cell. The organization is believed to have spread into other parts of Asia and to have established itself in a number of major North American cities. No criminal activity seems to be beneath them, as it has been accused of virtually everything under the sun.

No.4 D-Company

Home: India and the United Arab Emirates
Criminal activates: Arms dealings, drug trafficking, terrorism, extortion, counterfeiting, contract killings
Boss: Dawood Ibrahim

D-Companys criminal empire is lead by Dawood Ibrahim, an internationally wanted man whose activities go from extortion up to alleged terrorist acts that include the 1993 Bombay bombings, which killed 257 people and injured over 700. Ibrahim has celebrity status in the region, having worked his way into the Bollywood film industry, both socially and professionally. According to the U.S. Treasury, Ibrahim has ties to al-Qaida and the Taliban, and is believed to be hiding out in Pakistan. It is also believed that hes had plastic surgery to change his appearance, although theres little he can do about his height of 54.

No.3 'Ndrangheta

Home base: Calabria (Southern Italy)
Criminal activities: Drug trafficking, contract killings, extortion
Boss: Horizontal hierarchy – rule by assembly

At 10,000 members and growing, and with annual revenues in the tens of billions of dollars, Italys Ndrangheta has emerged as the countrys most powerful cocaine trafficking operation and a major European supplier according to a report released by the Italian parliament’s anti-mafia commission.

Their success is likened to fast food restaurants in how they offer the identical, recognizable, reliable brand, and the same criminal product. They maintain loyalty through family ties and a lack of centralized leadership, giving them a leg up on the likes of the Sicilian Cosa Nostras more vulnerable hierarchy.

No.2 Yamaguchi-gumi

Home base: Kobe, Japan
Criminal activities: Extortion, gambling, gunrunning, prostitution, drug trafficking, loan-sharking
Boss: Shinobu Tsukasa (real name: Kenichi Shinoda)

The Kobe-based Yamaguchi-gumi dates back to 1915, but owes its current status as Japans largest and most powerful yakuza (criminal syndicate) to ultra-violent mastermind Kazuo Taoka, the organizations longtime oyabun. In fact, his death in 1981 was sufficiently profound to shake the groups foundations.

Today, the Yamaguchi-gumis membership is estimated at around 40,000 and is led by its sixth don, the diplomatic – but no less violent – Shinobu Tsukasa, who took over in 2005. Tsukasa is attempting to lead the organization north toward Tokyo, despite his imprisonment for possessing a firearm.

No.1 Solntsevskaya bratva

Home base: Moscow, Russia
Activities: Extortion, drug trafficking, auto theft, trafficking in stolen art, money laundering, contract killings, arms dealing, trading nuclear material, prostitution, oil deals
Boss: Sergei Mikhailov

Former FBI Special Agent Bob Levinson called the Russian mafia the most dangerous people on earth, a terrifying notion when you consider that their ranks may be as many as 300,000 strong, and spread across 450 groups.

Chief among them is Moscow-based Solntsevskaya bratva, an extraordinarily wealthy and ruthless syndicate reputedly run by its founder, Sergei Mikhailov, a man both hardened by years in the gulags and especially connected thanks to the criminals he met there, which include reputed don Semion Mogilevich, among others.

Sources :
http://en.wikipedia.org
http://www.foreignpolicy.com
http://www.trutv.com
http://news.bbc.co.uk
http://www.taipeitimes.com
http://www.fbi.gov
http://www.pbs.org
http://nymag.com
http://search.japantimes.co.jp
http://www.experiencefestival.com
http://findarticles.com
http://www.canada.com
http://www.sfgate.com
http://taiwanmatters.blogspot.com
http://gangstersinc.tripod.com
http://www.askmen.com

Global Challenges Facing Humanity

Challenge No. 12 - How can transnational organized crime networks be stopped from becoming more powerful and sophisticated global enterprises?

Although the world is waking up to the enormity of the threat of transnational organized crime, it continues to grow, while a global strategy to address this global threat has not been adopted. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime has called on all states to develop national strategies to counter TOC as a whole in its report The Globalization of Crime: A Transnational Organized Crime Threat Assessment. The transition of much of the world’s activities to the Internet and mobile phones has opened up a wealth of opportunities for TOC to profitably expand its activities from drugs and human trafficking to all aspects of personal and business life. The financial crisis and the bankruptcy of financial institutions have opened new infiltration routes for TOC crime, and the world recession has increased human trafficking and smuggling. UNODC also notes states are not seriously implementing the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, which is the main international instrument to counter organized crime. INTERPOL has started construction of an international complex in Singapore that will open around 2013 with 300 staff, to serve as a center for policy, research, and worldwide operations. UNODC, with other agencies, has founded the International Anti-Corruption Academy, near Vienna, having as one of its goals tackling the connection of TOC and corruption. That combination, allowing government decisions to be bought and sold like heroin, makes democracy an illusion.

The world illicit trade is estimated to be about $1.6 trillion per year (up $500 billion from last year), with counterfeiting and intellectual property piracy accounting for $300 billion to $1 trillion, the global drug trade at $404 billion, trade in environmental goods at $63 billion, human trafficking and prostitution at $220 billion, smuggling at $94 billion, and weapons trade at $12 billion. The International Carder’s Alliance is based mostly in Eastern Europe, the heart of cybercrime, which the FBI estimates costs U.S. businesses and consumers billions annually in lost revenue. These figures do not include extortion or organized crime’s part of the $1 trillion in bribes that the World Bank estimates are paid annually or its part of the estimated $1.56.5 trillion in laundered money. Hence the total income could be $23 trillionabout twice as big as all the military budgets in the world. The UN Global Commission on Drug Policy concluded that the law enforcement of the “War on Drugs” has failed and cost the U.S. $2.5 trillion over 40 years. It recommends a “paradigm shift” to public health over criminalization. OECD’s Financial Action Task Force has made 40 recommendations to counter money laundering.

There are more slaves today than at the peak of the African slave trade. Estimates range from 12 million to 27 million people are being held in slavery today (the vast majority in Asia). UNICEF estimates that 1.2 million children are trafficked every year. The online market in illegally obtained data and tools for committing data theft and other cybercrimes continues to grow, and criminal organizations are offering online hosting of illegal applications. International financial transfers via computers of $2 trillion per day make tempting targets for international cyber criminals.

It is time for an international campaign by all sectors of society to develop a global consensus for action against TOC. Two conventions help bring some coherence to addressing TOC: the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, which came into force in 2003, and the Council of Europe’s Convention on Laundering, which came into force in May 2008. Possibly an addition to one of these conventions or the International Criminal Court could establish a financial prosecution system as a new body to complement the related organizations addressing various parts of TOC. In cooperation with these organizations, the new system would identify and establish priorities on top criminals (defined by the amount of money laundered) to be prosecuted one at a time. It would prepare legal cases, identify suspects’ assets that can be frozen, establish the current location of the suspect, assess the local authorities’ ability to make an arrest, and send the case to one of a number of preselected courts. Such courts, like UN peacekeeping forces, could be identified before being called into action and trained, and then be ready for instant duty. When all these conditions are met, then all the orders would be executed at the same time to apprehend the criminal, freeze access to the assets, open the court case, and then proceed to the next TOC leader on the priority list. Prosecution would be outside the accused’s country. Although extradition is accepted by the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, a new protocol would be necessary for courts to be deputized like military forces for UN peacekeeping, via a lottery system among volunteer countries. After initial government funding, the system would receive its financial support from frozen assets of convicted criminals rather than depending on government contributions.

Challenge 12 will be seriously addressed when money laundering and crime income sources drop by 75% from their peak.

Regional Considerations

Africa: The West Africa Coast Initiative is a partnership among UNODC, UN Peacekeeping, ECOWAS, INTERPOL, and others to address the problems that have allowed traffickers to operate in a climate of impunity. The drug traffic from Latin America through the West African coast to Africa and Europe has been declining. Piracy, centering on Somalia and now invading the Indian Ocean, has become a major crisis, with 286 piracy incidents worldwide in 2010 and 67 hijacked ships and over 1,130 seafarers affected. Yemen’s unsettled future could leave the oil shipping lanes of the Arabian Sea bordered by two failed states. A multinational naval force is combating the problem, which is complicated by the lack of clear international legal structures for prosecution and punishment; Kenya has withdrawn its support in this area, but Somaliland and Puntland are helping. Some 930,000 sailors have signed a petition to the IMO to stop piracy. Smoking of “whoonga” has become a serious problem in South Africa, with robberies committed to support 90 per day habits. The 15 million AIDS orphans in sub-Saharan Africa, with few legal means to make a living, constitute a gigantic pool of new talent for the future of organized crime. Corruption remains a serious impediment to economic development in many African countries.

Asia and Oceania: The International Conference on Asian Organized Crime and Terrorism held its eighth meeting to share intelligence. Disease cut Afghan opium production by almost half, but the acreage stayed the same; four more provinces became almost drug-free, but domestic addiction is spreading. China is the main source for counterfeit goods sent to the EU. India is a major producer of counterfeit medicines. North Korea is perceived as an organized crime state backed up by nuclear weapons involved in illegal trade in weapons, counterfeit currency, sex slavery, drugs, and a range of counterfeit items. Myanmar is accused of deporting migrants to Thailand and Malaysia, where they are exploited, and has reportedly become a center for the ivory trade and elephant smuggling. Myanmar and China remain the primary sources of amphetamine-type stimulants in Asia; Myanmar rebels are exporting hundreds of millions of tablets to Thailand to raise money. A report says Australia has a multi-billion-dollar drug enterprise, and Australians are among the world’s highest per capita consumers of illicit stimulants.

Europe: Europol published a 2011 TOC Threat Assessment at http://www.europol.europa.eu, indicating greater TOC mobility, operational diversity, and internal collaboration. The EU has strengthened controls on money transfers across its borders to address trafficking and money laundering, especially in Eastern Europe. Russian officials have declared the drug situation in that country “apocalyptic.” An estimated 30 million in EU carbon emission allowances were stolen in January. The Italian Guardia di Finanza arrested 24 people from a 2.7 billion Chinese counterfeit fashion operation, and Milan police arrested 300 members of 'Ndrangheta. London police smashed a 100 million drug and money laundering gang.

Latin America: About 35,000 people have died in the Mexican drug war over the last four years, of which 15,000 died in 2010. Mexico’s cartels receive more money (an estimated $2540 billion) from smuggling drugs to the U.S. than Mexico earns from oil exports. About $1 billion worth of oil was stolen from pipelines (396 taps) and smuggled into the U.S. over a two-year period. Mexican drug cartels are rapidly moving south, into Central America, and are branching out, with La Familia exporting $42 million worth of stolen iron ore from Michoacn in a year. UNODC says crime is the single largest issue impeding Central American stability. Cocaine production in Colombia has dropped by twothirds and is now done by small gangs, using farms hidden in the jungles. The drug gangs have largely replaced the paramilitaries. Ecuador has become an important center of operation for TOC gangs (3,000 people have reportedly moved in from Colombia). Police seized a drug smuggling submarine in Colombia. Drug cartels exist in Latin America because of illegal drug consumption in the U.S.

North America: The International Organized Crime Intelligence and Operations Center integrates U.S. efforts to combat international organized crime and coordinates investigations and prosecutions. The 22-month anti-cross-border-drug Project Deliverance ended successfully in June 2010 after the arrest of 2,200 individuals and the seizure of more than 69 tons of marijuana, 2.5 tons of cocaine, 1,410 pounds of heroin, and $154 million in currency. Only about 53 miles of operational “virtual fence” were put in place in Arizona, at a cost of about $15 million a mile; the project has been dropped. Drug criminal gangs have swelled in the U.S. to an estimated 1 million members, responsible for up to 80% of crimes in communities across the nation. Organized crime and its relationship to terrorism should be treated as a national security threat. Canada continues as a major producer and shipper of methamphetamines and ecstasy.

what about pek mo and his henchmen?

Ah Long in Malaysia?

[b]World Black Market ranking.

Financial Value of all Black Markets:
$1,692,859.3 Million ($1.69 Trillion)
Average Black Market: $33.19 Billion

By Market :
[/b]Illegal Gambling$250.1 Billion
Counterfeit Drugs$200 Billion
Prostitution$187.67 Billion
Marijuana$141.80 Billion
Counterfeit Electronics$100 Billion
Cocaine$85 Billion
Prescription Drugs $72.5 Billion
Heroin$68 Billion
Software Piracy$58.8 Billion
Gas and Oil Smuggling$53.64 Billion
Cigarette Smuggling$50 Billion
Counterfeit Foods$49 Billion
Counterfeit Auto Parts$45 Billion
Counterfeit Toys$34 Billion
Wildlife Smuggling$32 Billion
Human Trafficking$32 Billion
Amphetamines$28.25 Billion
Movie Piracy$25 Billion
Illegal Fishing$23.5 Billion
Human Smuggling$20 Billion
Ecstasy$16.07 Billion
Illegal Logging$15 Billion
Music Piracy$12.5 Billion
Counterfeit Clothing$12 Billion
Counterfeit Shoes$12 Billion
Waste Dumping$11 Billion
Art and Antique Smuggling$10 Billion
Cable Piracy$8.5 Billion
Video Game Piracy$8.1 Billion
Counterfeit Sporting Goods$6.5 Billion
Alcohol Smuggling$4.3 Billion
Counterfeit Tobacco$4 Billion
Mobile Entertainment Piracy$3.4 Billion
Counterfeit Cosmetics$3.0 Billion
Metals and Minerals Smuggling$2.3 Billion
Counterfeit Aircraft Parts$2 Billion
Counterfeit Weapons$1.8 Billion
Kidnap and Ransom$1.5 Billion
International Adoptions$1.3 Billion
Counterfeit Alcohol$1 Billion
Counterfeit Watches$1 Billion
Fake Diplomas and Degrees$1 Billion
Counterfeit Pesticides$0.735 Billion ($735 Million)
Book Piracy$0.6 Billion ($600 Million)
Arms Trafficking$0.245 Billion ($245 Million)
Counterfeit Money$0.182 Billion ($182 Million)
Nuclear Smuggling$0.1 Billion ($100 Million)
Counterfeit IDs and Passports$0.1 Billion ($100 Million)
Organ Trafficking$0.075 Billion ($75 Million)
Counterfeit Purses$0.07 Billion ($70 Million)
Counterfeit Lighters$0.042 Billion ($42 Million)
Counterfeit Batteries$0.023 Billion ($23 Million)

[b]Financial Value of Countries Black Markets:
$1,920,040.09 Million ($1.92 Trillion)
Average Country Black Market: $21.09 Billion

By Countries :[/b]
United States$620.63 Billion <-- No. 1
China$261 Billion
Mexico$126.08 Billion
Spain$123.48 Billion
Italy$111.05 Billion
Japan$108.3 Billion
Canada$77.83 Billion
United Kingdom$62.06 Billion
Russia$49.04 Billion
Germany$39.67 Billion
South Korea$26.2 Billion
Nigeria$24.98 Billion
Peru$22.04 Billion
Indonesia$17.89 Billion
Philippines$17.17 Billion
Brazil$17 Billion
India$16.78 Billion
Venezuela$14.195 Billion
Paraguay$13 Billion
Morocco$12.7 Billion
Thailand$11.678 Billion
Iran$10.64 Billion
France$10.4 Billion
Australia$10.34 Billion
Turkey$10.25 Billion
Guatemala$10.106 Billion
Colombia$9.579 Billion
Israel$8.55 Billion
Pakistan$6.061 Billion
Afghanistan$5.3 Billion
Iraq$5.147 Billion
Bulgaria$4.741 Billion
Hungary$4.6 Billion
Switzerland$4.5 Billion
Ukraine$4.244 Billion
Saudi Arabia$4 Billion
Egypt$3.184 Billion
Greece$3.033 Billion
South Africa$3.00 Billion
Malaysia$2.64 Billion <-- No. 40
Taiwan$2.567 Billion
Ireland$2.356 Billion
North Korea$2.24 Billion
Myanmar$1.854 Billion
Romania$1.524 Billion
Kuwait$1.412 Billion
Argentina$1.066 Billion
United Arab Emirates$1.049 Billion
Zimbabwe$1.006 Billion
Laos$0.855 Billion ($855 Million)
Poland$0.854 Billion ($854 Million)
New Zealand$0.806 Billion ($806 Million)
Vietnam$0.8008 Billion ($800.8 Million)
Kenya$0.793 Billion ($793 Million)
Cambodia$0.598 Billion ($598 Million)
Netherlands$0.591 Billion ($591 Million)
Sweden$0.5463 Billion ($546.3 Million)
Haiti$0.500 Billion ($500 Million)
Czech Republic$0.434 Billion ($434 Million)
Somalia$0.414 Billion ($414 Million)
Chile$0.3896 Billion ($389.6 Million)
Bangladesh$0.325 Billion ($325 Million)
Bolivia$0.305 Billion ($305 Million)
Moldova$0.261 Billion ($261 Million)
Norway$0.261 Billion ($261 Million)
Singapore$0.2473 Billion ($247.3 Million)
Belgium$0.233 Billion ($233 Million)
Portugal$0.228 Billion ($228 Million)
Austria$0.209 Billion ($209 Million)
Denmark$0.208 Billion ($208 Million)
Finland$0.193 Billion ($193 Million)
Ecuador$0.114 Billion ($114 Million)
Cuba$0.100 Billion ($100 Million)
Mongolia$0.100 Billion ($100 Million)
Dominican Republic$0.0969 Billion ($96.9 Million)
Serbia$0.095 Billion ($95 Million)
Lebanon$0.0875 Billion ($87.5 Million)
Costa Rica$0.0698 Billion ($69.8 Million)
Jamaica$0.058 Billion ($58 Million)
El Salvador$0.055 Billion ($55 Million)
Georgia$0.046 Billion ($46 Million)
Lithuania$0.038 Billion ($38 Million)
Ivory Coast$0.036 Billion ($36 Million)
Brunei$0.033 Billion ($33 Million)
Latvia$0.030 Billion ($30 Million)
Jordan$0.028 Billion ($28 Million)
Estonia$0.023 Billion ($23 Million)
Cyprus$0.017 Billion ($17 Million)
Honduras$0.007 Billion ($7 Million)
Albania$0.006 Billion ($6 Million)
Nepal$0.0056 Billion ($5.6 Million) <-- No. 91

[b]Counterfeit Markets Ranking

Financial Value of the Global Trade in Counterfeits: $585.38 Billion
Average market value of a counterfeit good: $20.90 Billion

By Goods:[/b]
Counterfeit Drugs$200 Billion
Counterfeit Electronics$100 Billion
Software Piracy$58.8 Billion
Counterfeit Foods$49 Billion
Counterfeit Auto Parts$45 Billion
Counterfeit Toys$34 Billion
Movie Piracy$25 Billion
Music Piracy$12.5 Billion
Counterfeit Clothing$12 Billion
Counterfeit Shoes$12 Billion
Cable Piracy$8.5 Billion
Video Game Piracy$8.1 Billion
Counterfeit Sporting Goods$6.5 Billion
Counterfeit Tobacco$4 Billion
Mobile Entertainment Piracy$3.4 Billion
Counterfeit Cosmetics$3.0 Billion
Counterfeit Aircraft Parts$2 Billion
Counterfeit Weapons$1.8 Billion
Counterfeit Alcohol$1 Billion
Counterfeit Watches$1 Billion
Fake Diplomas and Degrees$1 Billion
Counterfeit Pesticides$0.735 Billion ($735 Million)
Book Piracy$0.6 Billion ($600 Million)
Counterfeit Money$0.182 Billion ($182 Million)
Counterfeit IDs and Passports$0.1 Billion ($100 Million)
Counterfeit Purses$0.07 Billion ($70 Million)
Counterfeit Lighters$0.042 Billion ($42 Million)
Counterfeit Batteries$0.023 Billion ($23 Million)

[b]Financial Value of Global Counterfeit Markets: $668.36 Billion
Average Country Counterfeit Market: $7.95 Billion

By Countries:[/b]
United States$225 Billion <-- No. 1
Mexico$75 Billion
Japan$75 Billion
China$60 Billion <-- No. 4
Germany$32.25 Billion
Canada$30 Billion
Russia$29 Billion
United Kingdom$21.6 Billion
Brazil$15 Billion
South Korea$14.2 Billion
Paraguay$12 Billion
Italy$9.3 Billion
France$8.5 Billion
India$5.033 Billion
Hungary$4.6 Billion
Indonesia$4.14 Billion
Saudi Arabia$4 Billion
Australia$2.716 Billion
Peru$2 Billion
Spain$1.984 Billion
Switzerland$1.6 Billion
Thailand$1.14 Billion
Argentina$1.092 Billion
Poland$0.854 Billion ($854 Million)
North Korea$0.74 Billion ($740 Million)
Malaysia$0.7215 Billion ($721.5 Million) <-- No. 26
United Arab Emirates$0.72019 Billion ($720.19 Million)
Venezuela$0.695 Billion ($695 Million)
Kenya$0.688 Billion ($688 Million)
Ukraine$0.644 Billion ($644 Million)
South Africa$0.593 Billion ($593 Million)
Netherlands$0.591 Billion ($591 Million)
Turkey$0.590 Billion ($590 Million)
Taiwan$0.5716 Billion ($571.6 Million)
Sweden$0.5463 Billion ($546.3 Million)
Philippines$0.5081 Billion ($508.1 Million)
Kuwait$0.500 Billion (500 Million)
Israel$0.5 Billion ($500 Million)
Vietnam$0.439 Billion ($439 Million)
Greece$0.4332 Billion ($433.2 Million)
Chile$0.3896 Billion ($389.6 Million)
Ireland$0.32957 Billion ($329.57 Million)
Bangladesh$0.325 Billion ($325 Million)
Colombia$0.319 Billion ($319 Million)
Pakistan$0.297 Billion ($2297 Million)
Nigeria$0.288 Billion ($288 Million)
Norway$0.261 Billion ($261 Million)
Singapore$0.2473 Billion ($247.3 Million)
Czech Republic$0.234 Billion ($234 Million)
Belgium$0.233 Billion ($233 Million)
Portugal$0.228 Billion ($228 Million)
Morocco$0.226 Billion ($226 Million)
Romania$0.224 Billion ($224 Million)
Austria$0.209 Billion ($209 Million)
Denmark$0.208 Billion ($208 Million)
Finland$0.193 Billion ($193 Million)
Bulgaria$0.149 Billion ($149 Million)
Iraq$0.147 Billion ($147 Million)
New Zealand$0.134 Billion ($134 Million)
Ecuador$0.114 Billion ($114 Million)
Guatemala$0.106 Billion ($106 Million)
Laos$0.105 Billion ($105 Million)
Cuba$0.1 Billion ($100 Million)
Iran$0.1 Billion ($100 Million)
Dominican Republic$0.0969 Billion ($96.9Million)
Serbia$0.095 Billion ($95 Million)
Lebanon$0.0875 Billion ($87.5 Million)
Bolivia$0.070 Billion ($70 Million)
Costa Rica$0.0698 Billion ($69.8 Million)
El Salvador$0.055 Billion ($55 Million)
Cambodia$0.052 Billion ($52 Million)
Georgia$0.046 Billion ($46 Million)
Lithuania$0.038 Billion ($38 Million)
Moldova$0.036 Billion ($36 Million)
Latvia$0.030 Billion ($30 Million)
Jordan$0.028 Billion ($28 Million)
Estonia$0.023 Billion ($23 Million)
Brunei$0.019 Billion ($19 Million)
Cyprus$0.017 Billion ($17 Million)
Ivory Coast$0.013 Billion ($13 Million)
Zimbabwe$0.006 Billion ($6 Million)
Albania$0.006 Billion ($6 Million)
Nepal$0.0056 Billion ($5.6 Million)
Myanmar$0.004 Billion ($4 Million)

From the list above, no wonder the USA is going to collapse soon. Huge debt plus the No. 1 country with highest black market. Best thing is, when we start to question which country comes out with the most fake goods, counterfeit items or ripped off parts, The answer will always be China. But, guess the biggest hypocrite is still the USA.

Source :
http://www.havocscope.com/

hmm… where is PM & Cronies Co. ? Biggest Organized Crime maker ever in Malaysia… guess they are not big enough to be listed up there… so they are just too good to cover up their crimes?

Someone is missing in the list… Our PM’s… past and present… and also a certain CM…
Maybe a few companies or so… Stealing , threatening as well…Shooting, intimidating ? Heard of some cases…