Warning to all mirian's

ooo… but really its not our fault! why the hell they want to shut it? even the sharing sites US/anyone dont shut it down… because they know its not their fault haha…

I think the police is aiming at those who smuggle those DVDs CDs…not us civilians…unless u hv like 50 pirated cds under the hood then most likely u will kena ehh…if not…there will be a hell of a commotion going on coz i think 80 if not 90% of the population r using burnt/ pirated cds in their car stereo…

& hw r they gonna check anyway? civilians nowadays very much can “pirate” their own stuffs…

I have more than 100 cds in my car, meaning that i have to be fined 40,000rm??? Woah! Crazy pipe!

Hmmm I need to fix a hard drive in my car. Anybody selling car pc here??

rm400?waaa so scareeeedddd~~~~~

LoL put HDD nice idea… pendrive lo… 8gb? 16gb? 32 GB? hahahaha… change ur playaer to use USB haha…

Just to share the other day my friends friend in penang was fined 10000 for having pirated stuff including cds and also songs on mp3. This i what i’ve heard they are running operation to stop the consumers now. When the buying stops the pirate operation stops

mp3 also kena?? the moduler wor…

coolman quickly go his car throw out all the pirate cds & left those SQL original cds…

bad news for all the imprint users hahaha

the problem is…some of us, download the stuff & cramp everything inside you iPod, memory stick, hp, MP3 players & burn into cds…
the piracy still there…you cannot stop it…

[quote=“Doctor”]I think the police is aiming at those who smuggle those DVDs CDs…not us civilians…unless u hv like 50 pirated cds under the hood then most likely u will kena ehh…if not…there will be a hell of a commotion going on coz i think 80 if not 90% of the population r using burnt/ pirated cds in their car stereo…

& hw r they gonna check anyway? civilians nowadays very much can “pirate” their own stuffs…[/quote]

i second u

what about those who purchase tracks online legally and put in mp3 player?

Got some info from here.
http://epaper.sun2surf.com/tuesday/pdf/theSun2009041406.pdf

Probably started by the record company. Down with RIAA & MPAA

i think after this season check on car then they will do check on every house every desktop or laptop…etc

How can I tell if a song is copyrighted?
Copyright protection is available to both published and unpublished works. That means that the copyright for any work, including a song, belongs to the author who created the work. Only the author - or those who the author has given rights to - owns the copyright. This generally means only the artist and his/her record label, and the songwriter and his/her music publisher, have copyrights in and to a given recording or song, respectively.

When we buy CDs, we do not own the copyrights to that music just because we purchased the album or single. When we purchase music, we only own the right to the particular copy that we acquired (i.e., we do not automatically have the right to make copies of the CD or to perform the CD in public places such as in a bar, retail store, dance club, etc.).

The symbol “” (the letter C in a circle), or the word “Copyright,” or the abbreviation “Copr” will usually appear with copyrighted materials. For example, if you look on the back of a music CD, toward the bottom of the small print you will find the symbol “” to designate it is copyrighted and who holds the copyright on that album. Despite the fact that online music files don’t have the copyright symbol present in such a visible manner, you should still assume most music online is copyright protected - just to be safe. In fact, most legitimately acquired files do have copyright notices embedded in the data, such that they may be displayed via your digital music player.

Doesn’t the first amendment give me the freedom of speech - meaning I can upload or download any song I want, regardless of copyrights?
Freedom of speech gives us the freedom to say what we want, when we want. But it does not give us the right to take copyrighted expression belonging to other people and give it away or otherwise use it at our own discretion. For example, freedom of speech allows us to write a book review and summary of a new novel, but it does not allow us to reproduce the novel in its entirety and make that reproduction available to others (as is the case with P2P file sharing of music).

What is the “fair use doctrine”? What does it mean? When I upload CDs that I have purchased onto the Internet, am I protected under fair use? What about when I download music from CDs I’ve already bought, is that legal?
“Fair use” is a complicated and often misunderstood concept under the law. Fair use is never a black-and-white inquiry, because it involves a balance of many factors, including the character of the use, the nature of the copyrighted work, the amount of the work taken in relation to the whole (both quantitatively and qualitatively), and whether the use undermines the market for the original work. In general terms, “fair use” tends to allow us to copy copyrighted material only for a “limited” and “transformative” purpose. For example, we can use portions of copyrighted works when we want to comment upon, criticize or parody such works. We do not need permission from the copyright owner for these uses. Basically, “fair use” defends us against infringement.

As noted above, the fair use doctrine can be ambiguous or vague. Not surprisingly, millions of dollars in legal fees have been spent attempting to define what qualifies as a “fair use.” In the end, no easy to define rules exist for fair use, and our only guidelines are those specified above (as spelled out in the Copyright Act, based on the first amendment) and the interpretation provided by numerous court decisions. The judges and lawmakers who created the fair use exception did not want to limit the definition of fair use because they wanted the law to have a broad, flexible meaning left open to interpretation depending on the specific context. Of course, for us that makes it difficult to rely on “fair use” as a viable defense to infringement.

If we download music from a legitimate and legal site, the music is legal and protected, regardless of whether or not we have previously purchased the CD that contains the music we are downloading. If we download music from an illegal P2P site, that downloading is illegal, even if we previously purchased the CD with the music we are downloading. This is because the copyright owners have not given permission for the copy of that music through the P2P site.

i think after this season check on car then they will do check on every house every desktop or laptop…etc[/quote]
hahaha

Halooo…

Anybody kena? Plz share if any…