Pitting tech against speed demon

Source: http://star-techcentral.com/tech/story.asp?file=/2006/5/10/technology/20060511140021&sec=technology

Wednesday May 10, 2006

Pitting tech against speed demon

NETHERLANDS-based company Gatsometer BV, a supplier of automated camera systems, claims that its technology helps reduce traffic offences and accidents.

It will be working with its two exclusive local partners Koordinasi Tulen Sdn Bhd (KTSB) and Isolectra Sdn Bhd (ISB) to introduce the systems into the Malaysian market.

KTSB is an information systems specialist while ISB is a hardware maintenance company.

Gatsometer said its systems are in use in the towns of Mesa and Tempe in Arizona, in the United States. As a result, it claimed, these cities have experienced a 40% to 50% reduction in speeding violations and a 60% to 70% reduction in red-light violations.

Road fatalities also dropped by 20% to 30%.

KTSB chairman Datuk Abdul Mutalib Razak said: We believe the introduction of this system is a timely one in response to the Malaysian Governments efforts to reduce road accidents and fatalities.

The annual number of road accidents in our country is very high. The number of road accidents has increased from 211,000 in 1998 to more than 300,000 in 2004. Our road fatalities are very high at about 6,000 per annum, he said.

KTSB submitted a proposal last month to the Transport Ministry for the system.

It announced that the Government would not have to pay for the initial set-up. Our costs will be recovered through a percentage of any summonses issued, said Abdul Mutalib.

The automated camera enforcement system includes the Gatso Digital Radar Camera and Gatso Digital Traffic Camera, which is capable of detecting and capturing speeding vehicles and issuing summons to offenders within 24 hours.

It is also able to detect and capture other offences imvolving cars and motorcycles, such as overtaking on a double line, running a red light, as well as driving on road shoulders and unauthorised use of the emergency lane.

The system offers front-end equipment, installation and maintenance of a data-processing centre for automated licence plate recognition and conversion of information from the front-end camera.

Also included is a system for storing and retrieving images and other data. The system also includes a summons payment system.

Perhaps they should come up with some tech to speed people up. Here in Miri we have some morons who are just fine with plodding along at 25KM/h. On the right lane. So people who come up behind them has to avoid crashing into them by swerving left.

Speed doesn’t kill. Stupidity does.

[quote=“ian”]Perhaps they should come up with some tech to speed people up. Here in Miri we have some morons who are just fine with plodding along at 25KM/h. On the right lane. So people who come up behind them has to avoid crashing into them by swerving left.

Speed doesn’t kill. Stupidity does.[/quote]

I strongly agree with you, but the thing is…these people are everywhere…hopefully they realised how danger it is before something bad happen… :cry:

Not to mention also, the drunk driving. During holidays and celebrations, at night, nearly 50% of the drivers were probably driving intoxicated, and a lot of them were driving well past the threshold of “how come the world is spinning”.

This is categorised under ‘dangerous stupid driving’ as well. Along with driving without lights (at night), turning without use of signals, double parking, double parking over an EMPTY space and (especially among the younger drivers) thinking they are master of ‘tofu delivery’.

Another thing I’d like to mention about hte 25KM/H slowpokes.

A friend of mine says her collegue does so and even does it proudly, saying “who cares about them*, just let them stay behind me, what’s the hurry.” And she still does it to this day.

Drivers have to be better educated. The attitude of people has to change in this regard too. After seeing this, and a whole lot of other scenarios, I believe that we still have a loooooooong way to go in terms of advancement.

  • the cars behind