Occupy Wall Street Movement

have you heard of “occupy wall street movement”? :slight_smile: i dont know either! :stuck_out_tongue: but i found these information to feed myself.
if only you are interested.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupy_Wall_Street

and, what do you know about corporate greed?? what is your oppinion on this?

also do we know that the giant corporate such as banks and all, that invest your superannuation and your money in the share market… is using your money to gamble and when it collapse, it is you that paying for it too… how does the collapse of share in one night actually reflect in the ACTUAL productivity of an organisation??

collective of videos

Group of Citi Bank customers attempt to close accounts as a form of protest- 2 dozen are locked inside bank until police arrive, 5 cops take down woman

Occupy Wellington

Occupy Melbourne

Occupy world:update from NY

well am not an economist :slight_smile: so i read more! :stuck_out_tongue:

How does stock price affect a company?
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index … 426AAWO9IE

Wall street crash of 1929
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wall_Street_Crash_of_1929

“The falls in share prices on October 24 and 29, 1929 … were practically instantaneous in all financial markets, except Japan.”

“the psychological effects of the crash reverberated across the nation as business became aware of the difficulties in securing capital markets investments for new projects and expansions. Business uncertainty naturally affects job security for employees, and as the American worker (the consumer) faced uncertainty with regards to income, naturally the propensity to consume declined. The decline in stock prices caused bankruptcies and severe macroeconomic difficulties including contraction of credit, business closures, firing of workers, bank failures, decline of the money supply, and other economic depressing events. The resultant rise of mass unemployment is seen as a result of the crash, although the crash is by no means the sole event that contributed to the depression.”

“Most academic experts agree on one aspect of the crash: It wiped out billions of dollars of wealth in one day, and this immediately depressed consumer buying.”

basically, what they are protesting, is actually relevant to all of us not just for the american. they are saying we comprise of the 99%, and the 1% is the giant coporates such as bank and the government involved…bcos the government is involved it bcome acceptable and become a law. the government is protecting them and they are greedy. they lie to us all. used our money to put it up for gamble so that they can benefit it.
when it collapse, they want us to rescue them and pay for the lost. technically, we are all affected. … when the big bank collapse, the government pump $$ in … to rescue them… and the impact is all on us the 99% …bank then put up interest, government increase tax, or introduce more tax, or having excuse about tax for climate change… GST etc…all sort of lie and cover up… the “politics” side of business…
then when business couldn’t cope, unemployment rate increase, everything increase in price… we are all affected.

And this is why, people around the world are standing up and protest for a change.

i think this guy said it well

and this article

Published in The Nation.

I was honored to be invited to speak at Occupy Wall Street on Thursday night. Since amplification is (disgracefully) banned, and everything I said had to be repeated by hundreds of people so others could hear (a.k.a. the human microphone), what I actually said at Liberty Plaza had to be very short. With that in mind, here is the longer, uncut version of the speech.

I love you.

And I didnt just say that so that hundreds of you would shout I love you back, though that is obviously a bonus feature of the human microphone. Say unto others what you would have them say unto you, only way louder.

Yesterday, one of the speakers at the labor rally said: We found each other. That sentiment captures the beauty of what is being created here. A wide-open space (as well as an idea so big it cant be contained by any space) for all the people who want a better world to find each other. We are so grateful.

If there is one thing I know, it is that the 1 percent loves a crisis. When people are panicked and desperate and no one seems to know what to do, that is the ideal time to push through their wish list of pro-corporate policies: privatizing education and social security, slashing public services, getting rid of the last constraints on corporate power. Amidst the economic crisis, this is happening the world over.

And there is only one thing that can block this tactic, and fortunately, its a very big thing: the 99 percent. And that 99 percent is taking to the streets from Madison to Madrid to say No. We will not pay for your crisis.

That slogan began in Italy in 2008. It ricocheted to Greece and France and Ireland and finally it has made its way to the square mile where the crisis began.

Why are they protesting? ask the baffled pundits on TV. Meanwhile, the rest of the world asks: What took you so long? Weve been wondering when you were going to show up. And most of all: Welcome.

Many people have drawn parallels between Occupy Wall Street and the so-called anti-globalization protests that came to world attention in Seattle in 1999. That was the last time a global, youth-led, decentralized movement took direct aim at corporate power. And I am proud to have been part of what we called the movement of movements.

But there are important differences too. For instance, we chose summits as our targets: the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the G8. Summits are transient by their nature, they only last a week. That made us transient too. Wed appear, grab world headlines, then disappear. And in the frenzy of hyper patriotism and militarism that followed the 9/11 attacks, it was easy to sweep us away completely, at least in North America.

Occupy Wall Street, on the other hand, has chosen a fixed target. And you have put no end date on your presence here. This is wise. Only when you stay put can you grow roots. This is crucial. It is a fact of the information age that too many movements spring up like beautiful flowers but quickly die off. Its because they dont have roots. And they dont have long term plans for how they are going to sustain themselves. So when storms come, they get washed away.

Being horizontal and deeply democratic is wonderful. But these principles are compatible with the hard work of building structures and institutions that are sturdy enough to weather the storms ahead. I have great faith that this will happen.

Something else this movement is doing right: You have committed yourselves to non-violence. You have refused to give the media the images of broken windows and street fights it craves so desperately. And that tremendous discipline has meant that, again and again, the story has been the disgraceful and unprovoked police brutality. Which we saw more of just last night. Meanwhile, support for this movement grows and grows. More wisdom.

But the biggest difference a decade makes is that in 1999, we were taking on capitalism at the peak of a frenzied economic boom. Unemployment was low, stock portfolios were bulging. The media was drunk on easy money. Back then it was all about start-ups, not shut downs.

We pointed out that the deregulation behind the frenzy came at a price. It was damaging to labor standards. It was damaging to environmental standards. Corporations were becoming more powerful than governments and that was damaging to our democracies. But to be honest with you, while the good times rolled, taking on an economic system based on greed was a tough sell, at least in rich countries.

Ten years later, it seems as if there arent any more rich countries. Just a whole lot of rich people. People who got rich looting the public wealth and exhausting natural resources around the world.

The point is, today everyone can see that the system is deeply unjust and careening out of control. Unfettered greed has trashed the global economy. And it is trashing the natural world as well. We are overfishing our oceans, polluting our water with fracking and deepwater drilling, turning to the dirtiest forms of energy on the planet, like the Alberta tar sands. And the atmosphere cannot absorb the amount of carbon we are putting into it, creating dangerous warming. The new normal is serial disasters: economic and ecological.

These are the facts on the ground. They are so blatant, so obvious, that it is a lot easier to connect with the public than it was in 1999, and to build the movement quickly.

We all know, or at least sense, that the world is upside down: we act as if there is no end to what is actually finite – fossil fuels and the atmospheric space to absorb their emissions. And we act as if there are strict and immovable limits to what is actually bountiful – the financial resources to build the kind of society we need.

The task of our time is to turn this around: to challenge this false scarcity. To insist that we can afford to build a decent, inclusive society while at the same time, respect the real limits to what the earth can take.

What climate change means is that we have to do this on a deadline. This time our movement cannot get distracted, divided, burned out or swept away by events. This time we have to succeed. And Im not talking about regulating the banks and increasing taxes on the rich, though thats important.

I am talking about changing the underlying values that govern our society. That is hard to fit into a single media-friendly demand, and its also hard to figure out how to do it. But it is no less urgent for being difficult.

That is what I see happening in this square. In the way you are feeding each other, keeping each other warm, sharing information freely and proving health care, meditation classes and empowerment training. My favorite sign here says I care about you. In a culture that trains people to avoid each others gaze, to say, Let them die, that is a deeply radical statement.

A few final thoughts. In this great struggle, here are some things that dont matter.

  • What we wear.

  • Whether we shake our fists or make peace signs.

  • Whether we can fit our dreams for a better world into a media soundbite.

And here are a few things that do matter.

  • Our courage.

  • Our moral compass.

  • How we treat each other.

We have picked a fight with the most powerful economic and political forces on the planet. Thats frightening. And as this movement grows from strength to strength, it will get more frightening. Always be aware that there will be a temptation to shift to smaller targets like, say, the person sitting next to you at this meeting. After all, that is a battle thats easier to win.

Dont give in to the temptation. Im not saying dont call each other on ■■■■. But this time, lets treat each other as if we plan to work side by side in struggle for many, many years to come. Because the task before will demand nothing less.

Lets treat this beautiful movement as if it is most important thing in the world. Because it is. It really is.

did you protest?

no. not yet

btw. i find your nick offensive. I would prefer if you do not post here. Thank you.
(are you LT_Dan?)

btw, i am posting this post along as to learn about them more too… to understand what was the actual motive behind this and are they rational… and how are they relevant to us all.

updates

Iceland “With the support of a furious citizenry, the government launched civil and penal investigations into those responsible for the financial crisis. Interpol put out an international arrest warrant for the ex-president of Kaupthing, Sigurdur Einarsson, as the other bankers implicated in the crash fled the country.”

http://sacsis.org.za/site/article/728.1

in my opinion, one of the biggest causes of this crisis, is lobbying

when politicians in the US, and most western countries, run for government, they cannot use government money to do so

lobbying is a system where by politicians secure funding for campaigns from private interests (ie; people/organizations/corporations with a lot of money)

therefore instead of having a balanced system with three factions (people, government, finance), gov and business have allied to squeeze all they can from us, and monitor us, and finally control us

what incentive would a politician have to propose and vote on responsible monetary policy, or any business policy for that matter, when the people who put them in office want looser regulations, less laws, less accountability

its not really the banks or the financiers fault, most people would do the same thing in their position, take into account the fact once you become used to a certain standard of living, wants become needs, excess becomes necessity, don’t forget that we live in a country where some people are still beneath the poverty line, and most of us lose our temper when the internet isn’t working

the ones truly responsible for this chaos, are the governments, instead of doing their job as democratic institutions (by the people, from the people, for the people) they have reneged on almost every single responsibility they have to their employers (YOU, ME AND EVERYONE!)

The United States is on the verge of an empirical collapse not seen since the fall of the Romans, and the representatives of the people are arguing about birth control, gun control, no-smoking zones and whether global warming really does exist (proof of lobbying right there)

No accountability, no responsibility, no principles, no conscience, and worst of all, no honesty

are you LoserT-DAN again? (just kidding :)) well can you stop wearing different masks? -.-

[quote=“Talindra”]Wall street crash of 1929
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wall_Street_Crash_of_1929

“The falls in share prices on October 24 and 29, 1929 … were practically instantaneous in all financial markets, except Japan.”

“the psychological effects of the crash reverberated across the nation as business became aware of the difficulties in securing capital markets investments for new projects and expansions. Business uncertainty naturally affects job security for employees, and as the American worker (the consumer) faced uncertainty with regards to income, naturally the propensity to consume declined. The decline in stock prices caused bankruptcies and severe macroeconomic difficulties including contraction of credit, business closures, firing of workers, bank failures, decline of the money supply, and other economic depressing events. The resultant rise of mass unemployment is seen as a result of the crash, although the crash is by no means the sole event that contributed to the depression.”

“Most academic experts agree on one aspect of the crash: It wiped out billions of dollars of wealth in one day, and this immediately depressed consumer buying.”[/quote]

That is the greatest depression era. You wanna know the culprit? Read the book The Creature from Jekyll Island . You will undestand more from there :slight_smile:

private bankers fault… more info can view here http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/bloodlines/index.htm

rich people problem
me get RM 350 per month
why i care about amerika?>

[quote=“petai”]rich people problem
me get RM 350 per month
why i care about amerika?>[/quote]

Because ur Rm350 will become 350 rupiah if you keep on ignoring whats happening around you.

[quote=“BlackOrder”][quote=“petai”]rich people problem
me get RM 350 per month
why i care about amerika?>[/quote]

Because ur Rm350 will become 350 rupiah if you keep on ignoring whats happening around you.[/quote]

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