Living in a Dog Cage - China

DOG CAGE MEN

Submitted by Alex Thomas

In a city of escalating urban housing prices, $160 USD can buy a 6ft by 3ft iron cage in one of Hong Kongs disused tenant building. Originally created to accommodate migrant workers, cage homes are now home to around 1000 Hongkongese.

Cage homes first arose following the 1949 Chinese Civil War, when waves of refugees descended on island in search of low-cost housing. Looking to maximize profit, landlords gutted apartment floors and packed in iron cages, stacked in threes and fours.

There were once up to 600 of these cage homes, one may of thought they would have disappeared over time, however an estimated 100 exist today, only 15 of which are government licensed.

Todays cages homes are no longer occupied not by able bodied migrant workers, but the elderly, the mentally ill and the working poor.

Chen, 57, lives in such a cage home with nine other men between 57-84, each suffering from varying health complaints, from Arthritis to Schizophrenia.

He currently pays $160 USD a month for his cage, communal TV, overhead fan, toilet and a wall phone. The 20m2 space is damp, cramped, with no basic amenities such as kitchens and bathrooms.

Life here is very difficult and at times very depressing, we just exist here, explains Chen.

Chen first arrived in Hong Kong from Dongaun, China in 1972, commanding the top salary of the time of $20 USD a week as a scaffold worker, allowing him to support his wife and young family in Mainland China.

However, this success was short-lived, as work came in short supply following the opening up of China in the 80s which saw many industries migrate across the border to the mainland. To add salt in the wound Chen was forced into early retirement after his leg was crushed in a construction accident in 1989.

Chen currently receives $340 USD month in welfare support and medical care for the injuries sustained in the construction industry. Daily life varies very little for Chen; I wake up at around 9 read the papers, go for lunch at the restaurant next door, sleep, order take away from the restaurant play board games and watch TV.

Many of these people are at an age where they are too scared to move away from an environment they are so familiar with, explains Mr. Chan of SoCO, an agency that helps low-income workers secure public housing.

Chen, who last saw his family at last year Spring Festival, dreams of reuniting with his family back in Donguan.

I will not live out my last years in this cage.

http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/041/Reuters_BobbyYip1_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/032/Reuters_Bobby_Yip_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/037/Reuters_BobbyYip4_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/035/Reuters_BobbyYip2_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/039/Reuters_VictorFraile_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/042/SoCO_caged_homes_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/036/Reuters_BobbyYip3_content.jpg


http://www.time.com/time/world/article/ … 97,00.html
http://chinadigitaltimes.net/china/cage-homes/
http://www.fotoevidence.com/injust/176
http://www.arkinet.com/articles/hong-kongs-cage-homes

meanwhile in USA


Hey, judging from your previous posts, seems like you very anti china and love US ler. Why don’t u go and live in US then?

You portrayed an overly rosy picture for the US.

America is my second home and I moved around Fresno, California. I’ll tell you that things aren’t as good as one initially imagined or expected, and California is the leading state for homelessness

used to think americans are pretty well-off but my perception changed since then.

He was just posting a news about people living in cages which was supposed meant to be for a dog. He did not even say anything about anti china. There’s nothing wrong about that? LOL :shock:

He was just posting a news about people living in cages which was supposed meant to be for a dog. He did not even say anything about anti china. There’s nothing wrong about that? LOL :shock:[/quote]

hi ting mei yi :slight_smile:

sorry to see that… the homeless has to do that i think because otherwise their only belonging can be stollen by another homeless when they are asleep…

[quote=“mevotex”]You portrayed an overly rosy picture for the US.

America is my second home and I moved around Fresno, California. I’ll tell you that things aren’t as good as one initially imagined or expected, and California is the leading state for homelessness

used to think americans are pretty well-off but my perception changed since then.[/quote]

Thanks to Hollywood, most people around the world would think that American are well-off. They’re too overrated in medias.

He was just posting a news about people living in cages which was supposed meant to be for a dog. He did not even say anything about anti china. There’s nothing wrong about that? LOL :shock:[/quote]

hi ting mei yi :)[/quote]

Hi. :smiley:

the thing is, homeless are everywhere including the well develop country.
It’s almost like part of the culture. some homeless ppl actually has a house but they don’t live in it, bcos having a house doesn’t mean having a home.
A lot of homeless ppl suffer fro depression, and many mental health issue that separate them from the general community… to them it doesn’t matter where they sleep.

some homeless is purely poverty… but a lot in the well develop country aren’t. They are just lost and unsure what they really want in life

China took millions of jobs away from USA citizens…well, you know what happens next

maybe we should kinda stop putting blame at others and look at the problem internally…?

how much will he offer me the teddy bear …haha .joke*

[quote=“Lt Dan”]DOG CAGE MEN

Submitted by Alex Thomas

In a city of escalating urban housing prices, $160 USD can buy a 6ft by 3ft iron cage in one of Hong Kongs disused tenant building. Originally created to accommodate migrant workers, cage homes are now home to around 1000 Hongkongese.

Cage homes first arose following the 1949 Chinese Civil War, when waves of refugees descended on island in search of low-cost housing. Looking to maximize profit, landlords gutted apartment floors and packed in iron cages, stacked in threes and fours.

There were once up to 600 of these cage homes, one may of thought they would have disappeared over time, however an estimated 100 exist today, only 15 of which are government licensed.

Todays cages homes are no longer occupied not by able bodied migrant workers, but the elderly, the mentally ill and the working poor.

Chen, 57, lives in such a cage home with nine other men between 57-84, each suffering from varying health complaints, from Arthritis to Schizophrenia.

He currently pays $160 USD a month for his cage, communal TV, overhead fan, toilet and a wall phone. The 20m2 space is damp, cramped, with no basic amenities such as kitchens and bathrooms.

Life here is very difficult and at times very depressing, we just exist here, explains Chen.

Chen first arrived in Hong Kong from Dongaun, China in 1972, commanding the top salary of the time of $20 USD a week as a scaffold worker, allowing him to support his wife and young family in Mainland China.

However, this success was short-lived, as work came in short supply following the opening up of China in the 80s which saw many industries migrate across the border to the mainland. To add salt in the wound Chen was forced into early retirement after his leg was crushed in a construction accident in 1989.

Chen currently receives $340 USD month in welfare support and medical care for the injuries sustained in the construction industry. Daily life varies very little for Chen; I wake up at around 9 read the papers, go for lunch at the restaurant next door, sleep, order take away from the restaurant play board games and watch TV.

Many of these people are at an age where they are too scared to move away from an environment they are so familiar with, explains Mr. Chan of SoCO, an agency that helps low-income workers secure public housing.

Chen, who last saw his family at last year Spring Festival, dreams of reuniting with his family back in Donguan.

I will not live out my last years in this cage.

http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/041/Reuters_BobbyYip1_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/032/Reuters_Bobby_Yip_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/037/Reuters_BobbyYip4_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/035/Reuters_BobbyYip2_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/039/Reuters_VictorFraile_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/042/SoCO_caged_homes_content.jpg
http://cdn.arkinet.com/p/images/000/002/036/Reuters_BobbyYip3_content.jpg


http://www.time.com/time/world/article/ … 97,00.html
http://chinadigitaltimes.net/china/cage-homes/
http://www.fotoevidence.com/injust/176
http://www.arkinet.com/articles/hong-kongs-cage-homes[/quote]

just wondering how people can treat their own parents like this?