How far can i go with a kit lens?

I’m new at DSLR photographing, don even have my own dslr yet, still consider on buying D3000… I wish to learn, and my budget is limited… If i get a D3000 that comes with AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR lens, how far can i go? can i shoot moving object? can i shoot macro photos? Is it a must to get a better lens? I hope some pro photographer give me some advice, whether i should buy a DSLR or just stick to my P&S camera (Canon IXUS 100 IS) I wish to take detailed photos…

“… to infinity and beyond…” well sort of. You find the 18~55 lens very useful in general photography. If you are creative and find how to use it, it’ll go to “infinity & beyond”! Most lenses (if not all) can shoot moving object, macro and much more if you know how to use it properly. As you develop your skills you will slowly find the need to get more lenses. 3000D is a good budget camera for beginners and will serve as a good backup camera for amateur, semi-pro and pros too. If you are serious about photography, don’t waste your time & money with IXUS.

icic, thx for your advice ^^

Get to know your cam well, learn the basic of photography… combine both, you’ll get creativity…

Cheers…

I agreed with lasting99. Start off with a kit lens until u know what lens u need in the future. There’s not much marco that you can shoot, but i believe there’s reversal ring for you to mount ur lens to shoot macro but thats for you to discover later on. Check out that camera review in http://www.dpreview.com and get down to the shop and hold and feeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeel the camera… see if u like it or not… appearance should be taking into consideration when ur buying a camera too. A little bit of research before buying. Tat’s what u need. Good luck.

Felix, judging from your questions… i think you’re into macro photography of moving/living things (bugs, a pet tortoise? – the one from your headshot?)… if that’s the case, you might need a DSLR and a macro lens for the sake of focusing speed when these creatures move (not so much of a problem for the tortoise…hehe… just kidding). If you buy the D3000, you could buy a 3rd party (Tamron, sigma,etc) macro lens if the Nikon version is too expensive. Alternately, you could try Pete’s suggestion on reverse lens… but if you are serious to do macro, buy a macro lens :slight_smile: I think kit-lens is not good for macro at all, period.

As for the cheaper option, find a better P&S camera, one that has 1cm or even 0cm macro mode. I’ve seen amazing macro shots using P&S. Manual mode/focus & high/good ISO (sensor) would be very useful too.

Then what is the kit lens good for? as i know D90 comes with a 18-105mm lens, the bigger the mm, the better for zooming or what? but some lens is 14mm or 15mm only, what’s the difference? like a 55mm and a 18-105mm lens? so many questions >< I like to take scenery & my pet’s photo, but if i get D3000 mostly i’ll take human’s photo, like event or hanging out with frens… kit lens ok with that?

wow… you do have lots of questions for photography… yes, bigger mm = bigger zoom. smaller mm = wider angle, so 14mm is wider than 15mm. wider means you can see more things from the same position… but wide angle lens is not just about getting more into the view.

I would suggest you join the Miri Photography Society (http://www.mirips.com.my/contact.php), they organise photography workshop sometimes or outing activities… i think you can learn a lot from one of these sessions/activities. Alternately, buy some photography books and read (less effective but still useful).

kit lens is 100% OK with hanging out with frens! if not, ditch your frens and keep your kit lens. I’m serious.

Remember if you use reversing ring, you lose AF control and auto aperture control. Also be extra carefull with the rear lens element as it is very delicate and will be unprotected. Other alternative if you want to retain the full auto functions of the lens for macro photography are extension tubes and close-up lenses attachment. Of course if you can afford a macro lens that would be the best.

[quote=“beingelvish”]Felix, judging from your questions… i think you’re into macro photography of moving/living things (bugs, a pet tortoise? – the one from your headshot?)… if that’s the case, you might need a DSLR and a macro lens for the sake of focusing speed when these creatures move (not so much of a problem for the tortoise…hehe… just kidding). If you buy the D3000, you could buy a 3rd party (Tamron, sigma,etc) macro lens if the Nikon version is too expensive. Alternately, you could try Pete’s suggestion on reverse lens… but if you are serious to do macro, buy a macro lens :slight_smile: I think kit-lens is not good for macro at all, period.

As for the cheaper option, find a better P&S camera, one that has 1cm or even 0cm macro mode. I’ve seen amazing macro shots using P&S. Manual mode/focus & high/good ISO (sensor) would be very useful too.[/quote]

Agreed with beingelvish too…

But wat i would guess is look for resources in the internet… find the basic of photography how it works… then if ur really into it. buy it with the kit lens… watever thingy is lacking… decide later when u discover wat’s missing…

practice lah, any cam will do, once u learn how to shoot, learn how to edit. ull be fine =)

http://plerstud.deviantart.com/
check that out =)

If u want to shoot fast moving object, make sure the camera can focus continuously on the moving object. There should be a mode setting in your camera that allows u to this. In addition, use a higher shutter speed so that the image will not be blurred. U can set the camera to exposure priority & set the shutter speed. This is where the lens come in. U will need to have a sufficiently low f number for your lens depending on the lighting condition of your shooting environment & subject. Generally low f number is good but bad for the pocket. IS (image stabiliser) helps too. I heard people describe it as lowering the f number by a stop or 2.

Regards,
Joe Ling

[quote=“joeling”]If u want to shoot fast moving object, make sure the camera can focus continuously on the moving object. There should be a mode setting in your camera that allows u to this. In addition, use a higher shutter speed so that the image will not be blurred. U can set the camera to exposure priority & set the shutter speed. This is where the lens come in. U will need to have a sufficiently low f number for your lens depending on the lighting condition of your shooting environment & subject. Generally low f number is good but bad for the pocket. IS (image stabiliser) helps too. I heard people describe it as lowering the f number by a stop or 2.

Regards,
Joe Ling[/quote]

Joe, i believe for shooting moving subject it all depends on the photog what they wanted to achieve. Where they want to freeze everything or they wanted to do panning. of coz, one requires high shutter speed, while d other one requires low shutter speed. I find image stabilization doesnt help much on shooting high speed subject, coz IS doesnt increase the shutter speed, as it only prevents motion blur from your hand. It is more useful on shooting more static subjects. I don’t know… maybe my VR isnt as good as IS. :mrgreen: .

Do correct me if i’m wrong! Thanks :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Pete, u are right. What am I thinking. IS is for shooting still objects.

IS optically stabilizes your shot by 3-4 stops!! when your shooting stills, IS is rendered useless

Good info here.

I’m thinking of getting 70-250mm (if i remembered correctly) as it’s cheaper and can zoom further than my 18-55mm.

Can elaborate further on this statement ?

[quote=“BoonHLaw”]Good info here.

I’m thinking of getting 70-250mm (if i remembered correctly) as it’s cheaper and can zoom further than my 18-55mm.[/quote]

My recommendation is to get used to your camera (with the kit lens) first before venturing into exotic lenses. After you have been shooting for a longer time, then you can decide whether you really need a longer zoom lens. I have been using a 24-70mm for almost 2 years now and I am still resisting the temptation to buy a 70-200mm. It is not a good idea if you keep changing lens because the micro dust introduced into the camera will settle on the sensor and causes image to be “dirty”. This will not happen if your camera has auto cleaning of the sensor.

First, let me help you to clarify the jargon used here: VR is vibration reduction, a term used by Nikon; IS is image stabilisation and is a term used by Canon amongst others. So, VR=IS.

To understand more, I think Ken gave a good explanation at http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/image-stabilization.htm.

Some people do not have a steady hand and any shot taken with shutter speed of less than 1/60s will cause the image to be blurred. With VR/IS, the same person can now probably take a clear picture even at shutter speed of 1/15s! VR/IS is good for both still and moving objects. A lens (or camera) equipped with VR or IS therefore helps you to take “clearer picture” at lower shutter speed.

VR/IS is not directly related to f stop although, indirectly, a lens with smaller f stop (or larger aperture) can boost the shutter speed upward by using a larger aperture (or smaller f stop, eg, F1.8 ). Then again, the depth of field becomes very shallow with smaller f stop, giving a “blurred” background which has nothing to do with “camera shake”.

That’s very expert + clear explanation, hehe.