Family of chopper crash victim still in shock

Family of chopper crash victim still in shock

MIRI: The mother of a Petronas Carigali contract staff is still in shock and disbelief over the death of her son, Aewan Faslasaini Salihin, 22, after the helicopter he was travelling in crashed in waters off Bintulu on Tuesday afternoon.

AEWAN: Supposed to have come home after two weeks offshore today.
She said that Aewan, a technician working with Dej-Teck Sdn Bhd, last talked to her before he went offshore middle of last month was about his desire to concentrate on his career.

I want to focus on my carrier and talk less, was what Aewan told his mother, Noraini Abdullah, 52, a Melanau who hails from Kampung Muhibbah, Kuala Baram.

That desire is never fulfilled because his (dead) body was found by the Search and Rescue team about 2.20 pm yesterday. His remains were rushed to Bintulu for a post mortem.

Noriani said that Aewan, her youngest child, was a friendly and cheerful person. He was easy to get along with and was liked by his colleagues and friends.

He was supposed to return home tomorrow (Feb 1) after nearly two weeks working offshore, she lamented, adding that there was nothing unusual about him before he left two weeks ago nor was there any sign of sort prior to his sudden demise.

Aewan was one of eight workers onboard the helicopter that crash-landed in the open sea off Bintulu on Tuesday.

I know it but I am still hoping and praying against all odds that my son is alive, she wept, while being consoled by her other children.

She said that Aewan had only been working at his post for six months after he graduating in mechanical studies from Pusat Giat Mara in Kuala Baram.

Aewans sister, Siti Hadzar, 36, who was very closed to him, said that every time he returned back from offshore, he would ask his mother to cook Kacang Dal - his favourite dish.

I was looking forward to seeing him tomorrow (today) because thats when hes back from offshore, she said while clutching a framed photograph of her favourite brother, still a bachelor.

Their father Selihin Rakawi, 56, who operates a canteen in Kuala Baram, was still in shock to be interviewed.

Meanwhile, several Petronas Carigali officials visited the familys home in Kuala Baram yesterday to offer their condolence.

Family members and relatives are also still in disbelief about the incident and are gathering at the home to give whatever assistance they could and offer words of comfort to the bereaved family.

Pretty tragic news. I was wondering how he was still strapped to the seats when others can get free. And why didn’t anyone turn their head back to check who’s still trapped in their seat upon exiting? Though given the nature of the situation i am not one to pass judgement.

I’m just wondering.

[quote=“ian”]Pretty tragic news. I was wondering how he was still strapped to the seats when others can get free. And why didn’t anyone turn their head back to check who’s still trapped in their seat upon exiting? Though given the nature of the situation i am not one to pass judgement.

I’m just wondering.[/quote]

I am thinking… they all might be in the panic mode… believe me… I was once in this mode when we have a Drills on the rig… this is during the time I am off duty ( sleeping ) and i did not heard the alarm bell ringing… and the campboss did not check the room properly to ensure everyone was up and he head down to the muster area… so the number is missing one person… sekali hujung hujung, they check the room again and see me still sleeping in my bed, called me and shouted “Fire Drill”… so I jump off the bed… put on my coverall… and straight to the change room and put on my safety gear ( for drills, it is a requirement to put on the gear as a minimum)… so when the drills is over… i walk back to the change room and try to look for my shoes… guess wat… my shoes is still in my room and I ran from my room to the change room without wearing any shoes and I did not realise that…so this is wat happen when u r in the panic mode… ur brain cannot function 100%.

So i guess… the survivors are in the panic and survival modes… so which means at that time… sendiri jaga sendiri la… and maybe everybody is trying to get off the helicopter as quickly as possible

just my 2 cents… :wink:

panic mode…anything can happen!

[quote=“ian”]Pretty tragic news. I was wondering how he was still strapped to the seats when others can get free. And why didn’t anyone turn their head back to check who’s still trapped in their seat upon exiting? Though given the nature of the situation i am not one to pass judgement.

I’m just wondering.[/quote]

I think he was sleeping when it’s happen… :shock:

Or maybe he was knocked out when the heli crash and the rest tried to get out. Very sad case indeed.

This isn’t quite related - but I once read there are many cases where during a water landing, people tend to panic and then inflate their life jackets IN the aircraft, and therefore drown because they couldn’t get out as the fuselage went down. So I’m just speculating that people who couldn’t swim would be more likely to do this, but of course, I could be wrong.

My condolence to family of Aewan. May his soul rest in peace and amongst the Solihin.

I understand that ALL PASSENGERS working offshore using helicopters are required to undergo helicopter underwater escape training which is a mandatory. What we learn in training, may not be even 30% of what actually can happen in real situation. He may be suffocated and passed out before the water landing and unable to get out of the heli. Everyone was busy to escape and survive in a PANIC situation. They may realised that one was missing later but maybe the situation at that time were too risky for anyone of them to make a rescue attempt bcoz I heard the sea wave was around 3 meter high.
:frowning: :cry:

sigh :frowning: