Canada: Saudi jails 2 women for helping a starving mum!

The Human Rights Watch (HRW) group is launching a global campaign to free Wajiha Al Huaider, a member of its Middle East advisory committee, and another human rights worker Fawzia Al Oyouni, after the two women was sentenced to 10-month imprisonment for attempting to help a Canadian woman who was abused by her Saudi husband. The court also banned them from leaving the kingdom for the next two years. Al-Huwaider and Al-Oyouni said they intend to appeal their convictions.


Women protesting the male guardianship system in Saudi Arabia

“Saudi authorities are using the courts to send a message that they won’t tolerate any attempt to alleviate the dismal status of women’s rights in the kingdom,” said Joe Stork, deputy Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. “We call on Saudi Arabia to immediately drop this case and stop harassing Saudi women who advocate reform.” The Gulf Forum for Civil Societies has called on the Canadian government to intervene while another human rights group, Equality Now, said it has issued a global alert.

“We are extremely concerned about the case. In Saudi Arabia, women need permission from their male guardians for marriage and divorce, travel, education, employment, opening a bank account, elective surgery, and almost everything. We are issuing an urgent alert today but this also relates to our new campaign on ending male guardianship in a broader sense in Saudi Arabia,” a spokeswoman from Equality Now said. Saudi Arabia is the only country where women are prohibited from driving.


Human rights group in Quebec, Canada calling for government intervention in the case

It all began on June 6 2011, when the two human rights workers Al-Huwaider and Al-Oyouni received a text message from Nathalie Morin, a Canadian woman, saying that her husband had locked the whole family in the house and left for one week to visit relatives in another town, while her supplies of food and water were running out, according to Human Rights Watch.

Nathalie Morin is a Canadian woman who fell in love with a Saudi Arabian man. She moved halfway around the world to live with him and that was her biggest mistake, said Nathalie’s mother Johanne Durocher, who has for years been pleading with the Canadian government to bring Nathalie and her children back to Canada, alleging her daughter is a victim of domestic violence, abuse and rape by her husband, who constantly denied her adequate food and kept her in the Kingdom against her will.

http://s23.postimg.org/wy41k7ta3/nathalie_journal_de_montrea.jpg
Newspapers in Quebec depicting a photo of Nathalie, the abused Canadian woman

Johanne identified the husband as Saeed Al Shahrani, a former police officer. The mother told reporters that she was worried about her starving daughter so she contacted Saudi human rights activists for help. Al-Huwaider said she and Al-Oyouni organized several trips by other activists to deliver food and supplies to the woman, but they did not personally visit Morin until they received that distressed messages.

Apparently the husband had found out their activities at some point and it was a trap. When Al-Huwaider and Al-Oyouni approached the house to offer assistance they were confronted by police who were waiting for them to arrive. The officers immediately arrested them and took them to a Damman police station for questioning. They were convicted of the Islamic Sharia law offense known as takhbib, or incitement of a wife to defy the authority of her husband.


Human rights groups say violence against women is pervasive in Saudi Arabia

Al-Huwaider told Human Rights Watch that during her trial, which began in late 2012, the presiding judge denied her and Al-Oyouni the right to adequately defend themselves by refusing to allow Nathalie to testify. The judge also declined to allow a Canadian Embassy official to attend the second trial session, in December. Despite the jail sentence, the two remain defiant. “These harsh sentences will not deter us from our Islamic duties of helping those who are oppressed, needy, and to press for women’s rights,” they said in a statement published in the Membar al-Ahwar website.

Saudi court accused the two women of trying to kidnap Nathalie. Al-Huwaider and Al-Oyouni insist they had never attempted to kidnap her or counsel her in how to leave her husband. “All they did was meeting her because they wanted to give her food,” says Abu-Dayyeh, Equality Now’s consultant for the Middle East and North Africa. Nathalie’s mother said she was stunned by the charges, “they never intended to kidnap her or take her to the embassy or talk to her against her husband,” Johanne told The Canadian Press. “Their only intention was to bring her food.”

Source:

http://www.hrw.org/news/2013/06/17/saud … -call-help

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/ … adian.html

http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/saudi-ara … -1.1197768

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/06 … 53178.html

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news … p-canadian

http://americanbedu.com/2013/06/15/saud … ian-woman/

Congratulations to Saudi Arabia. You have tarnish the beauty of Islam.

And Saudi Grand Mufti calls for churches to be destroyed… lol :shock:

[size=150]Destroy all churches in the Arabian Peninsula Saudi Grand Mufti[/size]
http://rt.com/news/peninsula-saudi-grand-mufti-701/

[size=150]Destroy all churches in Gulf, says Saudi Grand Mufti [/size]
http://www.arabianbusiness.com/destroy-all-churches-in-gulf-says-saudi-grand-mufti-450002.html

i really wonder what is the education system is like in Saudi Arabia…and HOW do they intemperate the teachings of Islam. Do they even READ the very basics…really weird these people…if really a true hardcore muslim country. then follow the books properly lah…since when the books said the guys can bully the girls?

I’m not a Muslim but I’m pretty sure Saudi Arabia didn’t not read Al-Quran. See, I even know how to spell it properly. I doubt it they do. lol

Oh yes, they do know their Quran very well, my friend. It is the majority of us that doesn’t know much about it. :smiley:

twisted and ■■■■■■■■ are their system…

and sadly, thats the way it will stay for a longggg time

Oh yes, they do know their Quran very well, my friend. It is the majority of us that doesn’t know much about it. :D[/quote]

So basically u mean what they do is correct in view of Al-quran or islamic teaching and Al-Quran is all about oppression on women?
May i interpret ur post as such, since you said they know their Quran very well?

Oh yes, they do know their Quran very well, my friend. It is the majority of us that doesn’t know much about it. :D[/quote]

So basically u mean what they do is correct in view of Al-quran or islamic teaching and Al-Quran is all about oppression on women?
May i interpret ur post as such, since you said they know their Quran very well?[/quote]

He’s being sarcasm.
I’m a muslim and what Saudi Arabia did is totally wrong.