Any one from kayan background

Hi :smiley:

Just joined this website and found it quiet interesting. I am half kayan/chinese and now live in Aberdeen in Scotland. I came over to miri this year in january because my lovely grandmother Long Jok was very :oops: ill, and now she has passed away. I am hoping to come back to Miri next year to pay my respects to her grave.

I would love to get to know anyone from Miri or who are from a kayan background.

Lee lee

Lee Lee P… Welcome to Mc.net

Sorry to hear about your Grandmum dude…

I am sure you will get to know some Kayan background members in here…so make sure you do come back often to check it out ok… :wink:

If chinese… many many la… tat I m counted as one…haha…

Anyway… most importantly is… enjoy urself here… and do check out other interesting topics within the forum ok…a lot of useful information u will find it here…

Not to forget as well, anything u need… just drop it down here or PM any one of us…

have a nice day dude…smallee

Hi LEE LEE PATERSON,

Welcome to MiriCommunity.net! :smiley:

Hi LEE LEE PATERSON,

Selamat datai to MiriCommunity.net & nice to meet you!

Hello Lee Lee Paterson… :smiley:

Nun dengah? Sayu doh…Welcome 2 MC.Net - d place tat makes u feel 8 home… :wink:

I do hv Kayan blood in me (frm my great grandma side) n do converse very lil Kayan. Can I knw whch part of Kayan community does yr grandma cm frm?? :slight_smile:

Hi Lady bird

No I don’t mind at all. My grandmothers name was Long Jok and she was from Kampung Long Naah down beside river Baram. I was told by my mother that my grandmother was one of the daughters of a great cheif of Long Naah and was well known amongst other kayan longhouses.

My grandmother was a strong and kind woman who would do anything for her family and her longhouse. Now my uncle Wan Saging and my grandmothers brother are cheif of the Kampung Long Naah.

I went back there in January this year to get my grandmother as she was very ill. So we went there to take her back to Miri so she could get medical care. When I got to the longhouse, it has changed so much to what I can remember of it when I was a small girl. I use to play in the river baram with all the other children there when I was younger. There was many people who lived at the longhouse but when I revisited in January. It was mainly all the older people that were there. My mother told me that all the young people have left to go and live in the city of Miri as there, they have opportunity of work, schooling and medical care.

It is such a shame that the longhouse looked and felt so bare. Soon, I dont think many of the younger generation that have come from the longhouse will remember the traditions or culture.

I sit here in scotland and watch documentries with reporters saying that the amazon forest might be distinct if we dont help them but yet they dont point out that sarawak is going the same way. When I was on the plane coming over to miri, all I could see was palm oil trees and so little rain forest left. It breaks my heart that sarawak is changing to rapidly and no one seems to care about the culture of the tribe people like Iban, Kayan, Kenyah etc being forgotten and the rain forest being distroyed by the rich chinese busienessmen. :evil:

Thanks for welcoming to this community website.

P.s - Want to say hello to ryna as well. :wink:

Hi, Lee Lee!
What you said is true about the rainforest. When I was overseas I could see the whole picture about the unfolding tragedy in Borneo. When the forest is all gone, who would gain most? Everyone loses except some chosen few who made their millions and billions from our natural resources.

BTW, I learnt from a reliable source that a lot of Baram land, esp. Penan land has been taken by Tabuan Haji, a state Islamic body. The land would be worth a lot if sold.

Plez convey my warmest greetings to my good buddy, David Voon, formerly Environmental Head with SHELL if you know him in Aberdeen! :smiley:

I c…Long Naah hs d biggest Kayan population in Baram. Apart frm tis, ter r oso othr Kayan population along d Baram river bt nthg cn compare 2 d Kayans populations in Lg. Naah. Lg. Lama, Uma Bawang, Lg. Laput, Lg. Pillah, Lg. Kesseh, Lg. Liam & Lg. Tebangan r Kayans longhouses situated along d Baram river. Going further up than tis point, it wud b d Kenyahs population until Lio Mato. :wink:

Well, correct me if im wrong in tis coz I might hv ‘miss’ sm of d Kayan longhouses along d Baram river. Wat I shared here is based on my xperience growin up in rural area whn my dad ws posted 8 Lg. Akah. :slight_smile:

My great grandma cm frm a small Kayan community knwn as Lg. Seniyai in Akah river. As she ws married 2 my grandpa who is a Kenyah, she migrated 2 d Kenyah longhouse. 8 thse time, it ws compulsary 4 d lady 2 follow their men n stays wt thm shud thy cm frm diff longhouses. Tis situation is knwn as ‘ngivan’.

Such, it does effect d total population of d Lg. Seniyai Kayans so d Chief Village decided 2 xplore a new place 4 a new start whch lead thm migrating frm Akah river 2 Tinjar river n 2day, their new settlement area is knwn as Lg. Spelling. :wink:

2day, Lg. Seniyai dsnt exist nemore. :frowning: N tat happen more thn 3 decade ago.

[quote=“LEE LEE PATERSON”]When I got to the longhouse, it has changed so much to what I can remember of it when I was a small girl. I use to play in the river baram with all the other children there when I was younger. There was many people who lived at the longhouse but when I revisited in January. It was mainly all the older people that were there. My mother told me that all the young people have left to go and live in the city of Miri as there, they have opportunity of work, schooling and medical care.

It is such a shame that the longhouse looked and felt so bare. Soon, I dont think many of the younger generation that have come from the longhouse will remember the traditions or culture. [/quote]

Well, tis is nt smthg new n it dsnt happen among d Kayans only. It happen 2 all of d races in Sarawak. I quite agreed wt yr mom on her statements. :wink:

Frm my point of view, d situation requires d young one 2 leave their loved one 4 better benefits in line wt d development. Nw, tat wud b diff scenario if we r born o grow up in a develop country like yrself for example. U tend 2 appreciate d ‘green’ more thn us as it’s smthg new 2 u bt 2 us, we hd 2 gt out frm our ‘comfort zone’ in line wt d developments as it demand us 2 do so. Do we hv a choice here???

In relation 2 tradition & culture, yes, I do admit d younger generation dsnt knw much abt it bt nt all of thm. I’m knw sm of d younger generation tat r doing sm research on tis n will publish it 4 d public. :slight_smile:

U’ll gt 2 c more forest if u go further up bro… :wink: Nt tat ter r no1 care, ter r out ter…here, things r managed differently - in short, u talk more, u go 2 jail… :smiley:

Hi Lady Bird

Thanks for your reply and thanks for letting me know that Long Naah is the largest kayan population along the baram river. It made me smile because I am proud.

When you say that people in sarawak do not say anything about the logging companies taking there land because they are scared that they may be sent to jail? Is this true? Would they actually be sent to jail for speaking there own mind? How sad that the government would do such a thing to the people who originally came to sarawak first before any of the logging companies. I do not know whether I can say this or not but I am going to because I feel it is true and it stays strong in my mind. My mother told me that some of the gorvernment and police in sarawak are corrupt. The liase with the rich logging companies and back them up when ever they need the government or police involved. I think this is why there is so many oil palms are being allowed to be planted and so many rain forest being distroyed, because the government members and the police get paid to not say anything and let them do as they want. Am I right or is that a question that shouldn’t ever be answered pubicly?

I am glad that some of the younger generation do still remember there culture and traditions but I what I was trying to say was that in years to come, it may be all forgotten about. Maybe not just now but many years to come. As long as when they grow up and have chidlren of there own, they will pass on this information and tell them about the culture and traditions it will carry on into there childrens chidren and so on and so on. This is important that we remember where we actually came from and remember our ancestors and relatives who have passed away but still remain close to our hearts as without them, we wouldnt be here today.

Can I tell you a lovely story my mum told me about my recently passed away grandmother Long Jok? My grandmother was married twice. Her first husband passed away very suddenly and then she re-married (this is my mother father). He also passed away suddenly and leaving my grandmother to take care of 7 children. Although she got alot of support and help from the other members of the longhouse and her family. She remained strong and went away to help with the farming. And on her return from the farming, she would always bring back abit of what ever they had barbecued at lunch time at the farm for my mother and her sisters and brothers. This to them was a treat. Just like giving your children sweets but it was barbecued food. Food that they could of ate any day of the week but she would always take back some of the left overs from the farming for her children. This I thought to myself was so charming and kind of my grandmother. She didnt have much to give her children but she always found away of treating them to the littlest of things.

When I visit Miri I always meet alot of my relatives. Alot of them, not all of them but alot of them always asked me how much I earned at my job in scotland and told me that they were poor and couldnt afford what I get. This is sad and I did sympathize with them but they kept on going on and on about how little money they get. This making me feel so guilty and sad. But if I could afford to give all of them money I would but I do not think they realise the cost of living in the UK. Although the money here in the UK is good, the cost of living is expensive. We have to pay council tax, rent, mortgages, tv license, road tax, national insurance, electric and gas bills which is expensive because we use alot of electric and gas when it is really cold and snowing. Some of my aunties and unlces use to always ask my mother for money, but not once did my grandmother ask me how much I earned or even asked me for a penny of money. All she cared about was the fact that she got to see her daughter and her grandchildren. And that was the way she was. Generous, kind and not one bit greedy or selfish which I admire about her.

I will be returning to Miri next year in the month of maybe April or May 2008 so that I can visit my grandmothers grave for the first time. I did not make it to her funeral. Which makes me really upset :cry: and I feel as though I have let her down. But when I do come over, I am going to make her grave so beautiful. :smiley:

Do you live in miri ladybird and where about if you dont mind me asking?

:stuck_out_tongue:

Hi Cupid

Thanks for your reply. Unfortunately I do not know your friend who works for Shell in Aberdeen. I work for BP, Shells Rival hee…hee.

I am glad that it is not only me that notices the changes of the land in miri. The land is covered in oil palms and less rain forest trees. How sad that this is happening but I suppose it gives the people of sarawak jobs and this is probabley the only main way of surviving.

Do you live in miri yourself? If you dont mind me asking where about? One of my aunties stay at Taman Tanku and my unlce and cousins and brother live in piasua. I think that is the way of spelling it. :stuck_out_tongue:

Hi, Lee Lee!
I’m also in the Piasau (Ha! PIASAU!) area. I used to work with lots of Baram folks as well in Miri and the humble and gentle people are so unforgettable. I’m tempted to name names but that would ruin my life as a ■■■■■ cat in cyberspace!
You’re dead right about employment opportunities for Sarawakians at oil palm plantations. I’ll be optimistic the plantations like the giant IOI will have loyal local workers!
Lots and lots of land will be taken over for oil palm cultivation and we’re not talking about a few thousand acres. In the next 5 years 1 million hectares of oil palm plantation will be developed by the government with the aid of companies like the West Malaysian-based IOI. It’s promising an integrated oil palm plantation industry and downstream resource-based manufacturing,including bio-diesel as the contribution of the company. To date, more than 7,800 hectares have already been planted with oil palm by IOI.

d locals dun want to work in palm oil mill/ plantation.
no fresh water supply n very far from main roads
anything happen, die 1st then go straight 2 morgue
our Oil n Gas industry is still vibrant
more technical school n institute to train
in fact graduates from this training center r far attractive to employers
they may not earn s much s engineer or glamorous job title s engineer, but once u r in oil n gas n gain afew years experience, easy to get employed if u r hv ‘good networking’
sarawak still rule by one n only one…
d one…(u know la who)

Agreed wt Cupid & Haroldz jst mentioned… :wink:

Yes I’m residing in Miri Lee Lee Paterson…where about? I prefer tat remain anonymous till we meet in person during yr upcoming visit k… :slight_smile:

Yr grandma story n life xperience is similar 2 my grandma life story…I guess tat wat makes d ‘Org Ulu’ r gentle n humble people on earth… :smiley:

:shock: OMG!

Lee Lee! (Used to call u Lily…) I know u… Lina’s Sist rite? I’m very sure this is you. Here’s a prove… Ask mum bout this. “Marudi Agriculture Barrack” and see wat it has to do wif u? Write to me… lionel_property@yahoo.com.

wat a small world… :wink:

Marudi Agriculture Barrack??!! OMG!!! r u referin 2 d barrack near Marudi Police Barrack?? :shock:

Hi Kayan Boy

Yes that is me. How true, how small can the world be…

My mum use to work for Marudi Agriculture when we were still living in Marudi many years ago. I was only about 4 years old when i left. I still remember my old house without needing a picture to look at. I have emailed you. Nice to meet someone who I may of played with as a small child.

i have a friend…named permykid…his mom was kayan… ‘bun bavui nan’(daging babi itu sudah busuk) is only one bahasa kayan i learnt from him…haha…

I know this is late…but hey… Welcome to MiriCommunity.net Lee Lee!
I myself am also a Chinese + Kayan.
Dad’s from Penang and mum’s from Long Pillah.

[quote=“LEE LEE PATERSON”]Hi Kayan Boy

Yes that is me. How true, how small can the world be…

My mum use to work for Marudi Agriculture when we were still living in Marudi many years ago. I was only about 4 years old when i left. I still remember my old house without needing a picture to look at. I have emailed you. Nice to meet someone who I may of played with as a small child.[/quote]

OMG!! U r d cute lil Lily…My family used 2stay nxt 2 yr barrack… :slight_smile:

bahasa kayan susah to belajar…i have ask my friend (Permykid) to join miri community…his home dont have internet…